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Voting Buttons

   It has been a rough week - a week full of change about to happen (work) but not yet happening (work) and too much happening (at work).  Yesterday in particular was pretty awful (the work part).  I, unfortunately, couldn't shake the awfulness for most of the rest of the day despite writing with a friend in the evening and taking a lovely walk to and from Japantown to do so.  So today, I was just kind of fed up with the awfulness and decided, against all odds, I really would rather be in a good mood today.  So I put on an invisible Vote for Christin! button.
    I highly recommend this.  All day long I felt kind of awesome, imagining myself handing out Vote for Christin! buttons to the baristas at Peet's and Olga, the woman who holds the elevator door for people, and to everyone on Facebook.

Vote for Christin!
 
  See, I realized that part of the awful feeling was that I was powerless, screwed, and stuck (at work).  And these ugly old feelings of not being worth, well, voting for, or looking out for, just came out of the closet space where I keep Jr. High and High School memories.
   But then I discovered my invisible button.  And I'm casting my vote for...myself (at work)! I highly recommend trying this out: I'll wear one of yours if you wear one of mine!

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