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Happy Change

Currently my two favorite words in the english language are "severance package."  After waiting for MONTHS to hear what the selection process would be, I heard exactly what I wanted to: if you choose to not apply for a job in the new organization, you are eligible for a package.  The timing of leaving (may not be till the end of the year) and dinero details won't be known for a while yet, but by this time next week it will be clear that I've chosen to de-select myself.  Thank you very, very much.  
It will take a while to have awkward conversations, hash out details, etc before it can all truly sink in, but already I'm beginning to feel like this:

(this picture is a few years old and was originally one of about a thousand that I took of myself for my venture into online dating--a subject for another post--but still quite accurately depicts the sense of joy I'm beginning to feel)

Severance, from the infinitive to sever, is much too violent a term for what I'm opting for.  Mercy package would be a better term.  Or, if we're really spelling it out: No excuses not to write package.  

Time to start planning my exit party!!!

Comments

  1. Ha! Seems funny to say but Congratulations. And happy writing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Nate! It will be a well-earned congrats when it finally all unfolds. Happy writing to you, a whale and a town need you!

    ReplyDelete

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