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The Switch from Dumb Phone to Smart Phone

Super cute new iPhone to dumb, free-with-plan 4-year-old Pantech: 
"Remember how we were friends in Jr. High?"

"Well, that was nice and all, but now that we're in High School, we can't be seen together anymore."

Pantech: "Le sob."



iPhone: "With Pantech out of the picture I can finally commence my plan to take over the world."   

After much thought and deliberation, I have finally joined the smart phone world.  I go in with eyes wide open, knowing that there is no turning back, that I'm joining the ranks of people I've made fun of in the past, and that it could all get out of control, very, very quickly (angry birds, I'm looking at you).  It will make some things much easier and many things more distracting--if I let it.  I'm still drawing up the contracts with myself on how to approach the whole thing so I never become one of those people who can't sit alone for two minutes without pulling it out.  Onward to the brave new world!

Comments

  1. Congrats and good luck, Christin! I made the switch nine months ago and the little thing's damn seductive! Contracts with yourself are an awesome idea. :-)

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