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Lit Crawl 2013: Call for Curators!

This year I'm co-spearheading San Francisco's Lit Crawl, which I'm super excited about. The Lit Crawl is a crazy night of about 400+ authors reading during three phases in a march down the Mission district that marks the final night of Litquake's Literary Festival. It is a spectacular ball. I originally fell in love with Litquake through the Crawl, about 6 years ago when I first encountered the overwhelming goodness of being in a mass of people who loved reading and hearing stories. Shoving into a crowded cafe, bar, or laundromat to hear poems and stories read out loud by emerging artists, surrounded by people just as hungry for that very particular kind of fun, creates a kind of utopia. It's a night where job titles don't matter, your clapping and laughter become part of the cacophony of words that float down Valencia street, and your feet may be tired the next day, but your imagination is still fist pumping from the sheer joy of it.

Just how does a magical night like that come together you ask? It's a finely tuned orchestra of beloved volunteers, generous authors, the flight crew like myself, and of course, the curators. The curators come up with the events (readings) that make the evening such a rollicking and diverse mix, so that you can't help but find something special on the menu that's just your taste, and usually the problem is choosing between them. These curators are folks representing publishing presses, literary journals, or reading series, or a themed event highlighting the quirky, the humorous, the divine, you name it!

So if you, or someone you know is interested in a chance to curate a Lit Crawl event, be sure to submit here by April 30th (just six weeks from now!). We hope to make Saturday, October 19th a wild mashup of literary awesomeness and covet your great ideas on how to do just that!

P.S. Another super fun way to get involved is by volunteering. I've made some great friends, heard some incredible stories, and walked away feeling glad I got to be a part of that when I've volunteered with Litquake. You can sign up HERE for the fun!


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